News

PRESS RELEASE: A Bold Vision of Freedom

One of Catholicism’s Most Astute Thinkers Looks at Religious Freedom in New and Provocative Ways

“For anyone concerned with religion and the common good, Let’s Not Forget God by Cardinal Angelo Scola is a must-read” said John L. Allen, Jr., associate editor of The Boston Globe and author of The Global War on Christians.

On the heels of the Harvard “black mass” controversy and in a political climate where the issue of religious freedom is a constant topic of conversation, one of Catholicism’s most influential leaders is weighing in with a new book that was inspired by a centuries-old speech.

In Let’s Not Forget God (Image, June 3, 2014), Cardinal Angelo Scola, Archbishop of Milan and the person many people thought was going to become Pope after Pope Benedict XVI resigned, reflects on the continued importance of religious freedom and how it has affected all aspects of common life, from religion to politics and economics.

Born out of a speech celebrating the 1,700th anniversary of the Edict of Milan, Let’s Not Forget God demonstrates how these centuries-old debates have contributed to the development of Western societies from the Roman Empire in 313 to the American Revolution in 1776.

“Simply reviewing the major events of the seventeen centuries between the Edict of Milan and the present day should allow one to grasp the grave contradictions connected to the practice, and even to the conception, of religious freedom,” Scola writes.

In Let’s Not Forget God, Scola relates theology to everyday life, giving attention to how religious freedom has affected the development of democracy in Western societies and specifically addresses the historical view of religious freedom in the United States in light of the contemporary case of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) mandate.

“In the project of elaborating a new vision of religious freedom, Americans will be interested to know, Scola believes our legal and philosophical tradition is better positioned to lead the way than Europe’s,” notes Allen in the forward to Let’s Not Forget God.

“Scola continues to be among the most interesting and influential churchmen on the global stage,” writes Allen. “What this short book offers, therefore, is insight into how a true Catholic heavyweight approaches the Church’s most consequential political concern today, which is religious freedom.”

The publication of Let’s Not Forget God is particularly relevant in light of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) upcoming Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Serve which will take place from June 21 to July 4, 2014.

At the urging of the US bishops, the Fortnight for Freedom calls on American Catholics to take part in two weeks of prayer, education and action for religious freedom. According to the USCCB, the theme of this year’s Fortnight will focus on the freedom to serve the poor and vulnerable in accord with human dignity and the Church’s teaching.

 

 

To learn more about Fortnight for Freedom: Freedom to Serve visit www.fortnight4freedom.org

To request a review copy of Let’s Not Forget God, contact Katie Moore, publicist, at kamoore@randomhouse.com, 719-268-1936.


INTERVIEW: Patrick Madrid talks about his new book WHY BE CATHOLIC?

Q. What inspired you to write Why Be Catholic?

It was more a matter of “who” than “what.” Over the last 30 years or so, I have encountered countless people who have posed this very question. Some couldn’t imagine anything more ridiculous or objectionable than the Catholic Church, and others who were genuinely interested in becoming Catholic sought answers and information. I’m convinced that “Why be Catholic?” is a very important question, whether it comes from a scoffer or from a seeker. I wrote this book so I could present to the reader, regardless of his or her feelings about the Catholic Church, what I believe to be the compelling and convincing answers. These reasons can change one’s life for the better if they are honestly considered and explored.

 

Q. What do you love most about being Catholic?

I love being Catholic the way Noah loved being on the Ark when the flood came. Like the Ark, the Catholic Church is not perfect. It’s not tidy, clean, and odor-free. It has plenty of problems and challenges and unruly passengers, but it’s still the “ark of salvation” given to us by God and I love that I get to be on board. I love the beauty of the Catholic Church’s teachings, its Liturgy, art, architecture, music, and wisdom. I love the Catholic Church because it is “ever ancient, ever new.” I love tracing its existence back 2000 years to Jesus Christ and the Apostles, and I get to be part of that. I love being Catholic because of its richness and diversity. It’s a big hospital for sick people – sinners, like you and me — and it’s in the Catholic Church that I can receive the cure for what ails me. I love being Catholic because I can have the most personal relationship with Jesus Christ possible, by receiving Him, body, blood, soul, and divinity, in the Holy Eucharist.

 

Q. How did you become a Catholic apologist? What is the most rewarding part of your job? What is the most challenging?

Although born-&-raised Catholic, and never left the Church or even had the slightest doubt about whether I should be Catholic, I did nevertheless experience a profound re-conversion or recommitment to Jesus when I was in my mid-20s. As I was praying to God to show me what to do with my life, the door to the world of apologetics opened suddenly and completely unexpectedly. I tell the whole story here: http://www.catholic.com/audio-player/7779, but the short version is that God answered my prayers by opening that door to work at Catholic Answers, back in early 1988. I’ve never looked back, always grateful for this wonderful opportunity to serve in this part of the Lord’s vineyard. I think the most rewarding aspect of the work I’ve been privileged to do is knowing that it helps others draw closer to God and the things of God, not because of me but because the truth, as Jesus promised, will set us free. As for challenges, to be frank, I really don’t see any. Sure, the work sometimes involves routine inconveniences that come with travelling, but that’s nothing compared to the hardships Saint Paul endured, including beatings, stoning, getting shipwrecked, starved, etc. (2 Corinthians 11:23-28). That puts it all into perspective for me. I love what I do and I love that God permits me to do it!

 

Q. As a Catholic apologist, you sometimes participate in debates with those who reject the teachings of the Catholic Church. In your experience, what is the most common argument you hear against Catholic teaching?

I don’t enjoy doing debates, but I have done about a dozen formal, public, debates. The most common arguments raised against Catholic teaching are based on the underlying question of authority, everything from the “Bible alone” (sola Scriptura) argument to the “Science proves that God doesn’t exist” claims, and everything in between. Most arguments against the Catholic Church, I have found, are simply based on misunderstandings of what the Bible and the Church actually teach.

 

Q. In Why Be Catholic? you write that “being Catholic does not require that I fully comprehend every truth God proposes to me.” Could you elaborate on that point?

Well, for example, I don’t fully comprehend what it means to have a soul. I know I have one, I know it’s in my body. I can think, ponder, remember, be self-reflective, self-aware, and love. But how exactly that all happens in me, and how my soul and body work together as a single unit, I don’t fully comprehend. No one does. But we know these things are true even if we can’t understand all their complex realities. That is the nature of truth. It’s not necessary to first understand every single facet of a truth before he will deign to accept it. We all know this from personal experience in our daily lives. These divine mysteries revealed by God are deep and far more profound than the fact that I have a soul. We should never forget that a mystery is not something we can know nothing about, it is something we cannot know everything about.

 

Q. Who should read this book?

I wrote Why Be Catholic? For two particular audiences: the first is the person who is not Catholic, may not know much about the Catholic Church and, heck, may not even like the Catholic Church. I want to take that reader gently by the arm and show him what the stained glass windows look like from the inside, the way they were meant to be seen, with the sunlight streaming through them so that their meaning and beauty can be understood and appreciated. So many non-Catholics see the Catholic Church in a way similar to looking at a stained-glass window from the outside, where their beauty is impossible to perceive. I hope that non-Catholic readers of Why Be Catholic? will experience the adventure and wonder of exploring the Ancient Church in a new way and from a new vantage point.

The second audience, naturally, is Catholics, whether they are firm in their faith or wavering, plagued with many doubts and questions. For them, I pray that Why Be Catholic? will serve as a gentle and comforting reminder that they are in the right place. They are on the Ark and, no matter how turbulent the ride may get or how jostling the conditions on board might be, if they remain, with God’s grace they will make it through the flood.

 

To request a review copy or to schedule an interview with Patrick Madrid, please contact Katie Moore, publicist, kamoore@randomhouse.com, 719-268-1936.


PRESS RELEASE: LET’S NOT FORGET GOD

Archbishop Reflects on the Long Travail of Religious Freedom

“For anyone concerned with religion and the common good, Let’s Not Forget God by Cardinal Angelo Scola is a must-read.”– John L. Allen, Jr., associate editor of The Boston Globe and author of The Global War on Christians

What does one of the most influential leaders of the Catholic Church have to say about the subject of religious freedom?

In Let’s Not Forget God (Image, June 3, 2014), Cardinal Angelo Scola, Archbishop of Milan, tackles this very important issue and reflects on how it has affected all aspects of common life, from religion to politics and economics.

Born out of a speech celebrating the 1,700th anniversary of the Edict of Milan, Let’s Not Forget God demonstrates how these centuries-old debates have contributed to the development of Western societies from the Roman Empire in 313 to the American Revolution in 1776.

“Simply reviewing the major events of the seventeen centuries between the Edict of Milan and the present day should allow one to grasp the grave contradictions connected to the practice, and even to the conception, of religious freedom,” Scola writes.

In Let’s Not Forget God, Scola relates theology to everyday life, giving attention to how religious freedom has affected the development of democracy in Western societies and specifically addresses the historical view of religious freedom in the United States in light of the contemporary case of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) mandate.

“In the project of elaborating a new vision of religious freedom, Americans will be interested to know, Scola believes our legal and philosophical tradition is better positioned to lead the way than Europe’s,” notes John L. Allen, Jr., associate editor of The Boston Globe and author of The Global War on Christians, in the forward to Let’s Not Forget God.

“Scola continues to be among the most interesting and influential churchmen on the global stage,” writes Allen. “What this short book offers, therefore, is insight into how a true Catholic heavyweight approaches the Church’s most consequential political concern today, which is religious freedom.”

The story behind the book:

“This book came about through the preparation of the speech that for many years the archbishop of Milan has addressed to the city on the occasion of the feast of Saint Ambrose. The idea of this annual speech dates back to the deceased cardinal archbishop of Milan Blessed Ildefonso Schuster, but it began to take on greater importance with Cardinal Giovanni Battista Montini (archbishop of Milan and later Pope Paul VI) and in a particular way with Cardinal Giovanni Colombo. Why a speech from the bishop of Milan on this occasion? The reason is clear. Saint Am- brose is the city’s patron. Before being elected bishop of Milan he was a statesman, and he maintained this sensibility as a bishop, while obviously reshaping it to fit his new responsibilities as pastor. On the occasion of his feast and in light of his legacy, the bishop of Milan offers to all citizens a few reflections of a general nature on aspects of public life. The theme for my presentation in the Basilica of Saint Ambrose during vespers on December 6, 2012, was, in a certain sense, compulsory. This year marks the celebration of the 1,700-year anniversary of the Edict of Milan. However one may wish to interpret the edict, it is beyond doubt that 2013 provides a special opportunity for exploring the topic of religious freedom. Its relevance is plain. Just as evident is its complexity.” – Cardinal Angelo Scola, Archbishop of Milan

About the Author

ANGELO SCOLA is a Cardinal of the Catholic Church, a philosopher, and a theologian. He was appointed Archbishop of Milan, Italy, by Pope Benedict XVI on June 28, 2011. Previously, he served as Patriarch of Venice and was elevated to the cardinalate in 2003.

To request a review copy, contact Katie Moore, publicist, at kamoore@randomhouse.com, 719-268-1936.

 


PRESS RELEASE: WHY BE CATHOLIC?

Patrick Madrid Makes a Case for Catholicism

Why He Loves Being Catholic (and You Should Too)!

Patrick Madrid is a cradle Catholic. He grew up believing the tenets of the Catholic faith because that’s what he was taught to believe. As he got older he decided he wanted to test the teachings of the Church to see if they held up under scrutiny.

“I determined early on that having a good feeling about the Catholic Church was no substitute for knowing whether or not the teachings of the Catholic Church are true,” writes Madrid. “For me, plausibility was not enough. I needed to know whether these teachings were, in fact, the truth.”

In Why Be Catholic? (Image, June 3, 2014), Patrick Madrid offers biblical and historical evidence for the truth of the Catholic Church as well as personal rational for why he’s Catholic. The result is a compelling case for how to explain, share, and defend the Catholic faith more effectively.

“This book is as simple and clear as its title,” said Dr. Peter Kreeft, author of Handbook of Christian Apologetics. “In ten chapters, master apologist Madrid explains and explores ten good reasons to be Catholic—ten good, true and beautiful things the Church offers us.”

About the Author

PATRICK MADRID is the author or editor of twenty books on Catholic themes, including Search and Rescue, Where Is That in the Bible?, and Pope Fiction. He also hosts Right Here, Right Now, a daily radio broadcast heard on 240 stations coast to coast. He is an adjunct professor of theology at Holy Apostles College and Seminary and he is president of the Catholic Apologetics Academy. Patrick and his wife, Nancy, live in Ohio along with the rest of their family, which includes the blessing of eleven children and fifteen grandchildren.

 

To request a review copy or to schedule an interview with Patrick Madrid, contact Katie Moore, publicist, kamoore@randomhouse.com, 719-268-1936.


PRESS RELEASE: ANGELS AND SAINTS

NEW From Bestselling Author Scott Hahn

Angels and Saints: A Biblical Guide to Friendship with God’s Holy Ones

Angels and saints. Catholics tend to think of them as different from the rest of us. They’re cast in plaster or simpering on a holy card, performing miracles with superhero strength, or playing a harp in highest heaven. Yet they are very near to us in every way.

In Angels and Saints (Image, May 27, 2014), bestselling author Dr. Scott Hahn presents a church that is both heavenly and earthly, one in which the saints are present and available to us.

“It’s the Church where Jesus, the Blessed Mother, and all the angels and saints live today—in glory,” Hahn writes. “And we are united with them—by grace—just as they are totally invested in us—by love, to help the pilgrim Church to live on earth more and more like they do in heaven.”

In Angels and Saints, Hahn sets out to bring Catholics closer to their faith through a considerate examination of two of Catholicism’s most sacred traditions. The result is a rich and thoughtful book that shows how the angels and saints are with us in everyday life: as witnesses, as friends, and as family.

In part one, Hahn thoroughly explains the church’s process for canonizing saints, the scriptural foundations behind the Communion of Saints, and the role of intercessory prayer, among other topics.

In part two, each chapter is a meditation on the life of a particular saint. Included with each meditation are writings by or about the saints under discussion, found under the heading “Ponder in Your Heart.”

Hahn writes that his process for choosing saints was personal, “This book contains not a catalog of saints, but just a tiny sampling. I tried to include a representative variety, including angels and regular folks, characters from the Old Testament and the New, lay and clergy, ancient and modern. But, as I prepare the book for press, I notice that my chosen saints tend to be those with whom I have something in common. Most are teachers, scholars, and writers.”

Part 1 – Overview of Catholic Teaching on Angels and Saints, including:

The canonization process
The Communion of Saints
Purgatory
Intercessory prayer
Veneration
Relics
Guardian angels

Part 2 – A Saint for Every Chapter and a Chapter for Every Saint:

St. Michael and the Angels
Moses
St. Paul
St. Ignatius of Antioch
St. Irenaeus of Lyons
St. Jerome
St. Monica and St. Augustine
St. Thomas Aquinas
St. Therese of Lisieux
St. Maximilian Kolbe
St. Josemaria Escriva
Queen of All Saints, Mother of the Church

About the Author

Dr. Scott Hahn holds the Fr. Michael Scanlan Chair of Biblical Theology and the New Evangelization at Franciscan University of Steubenville, where he has taught since 1990, and he is the founder and president of the St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology. In 2005, he was appointed as the Pope Benedict XVI Chair of Biblical Theology and Liturgical Proclamation at St. Vincent Seminary in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. Dr. Hahn is also the bestselling author of numerous books, including The Lamb’s Supper, Reasons to Believe, and Rome Sweet Home (coauthored with his wife, Kimberly), and is editor of the Ignatius Catholic Study Bible and Letter & Spirit: A Journal of Catholic Biblical Theology. Some of his most recent books are Many Are Called, Consuming the Word, The Catholic Bible Dictionary, and Signs of Life. He lives in Steubenville, Ohio.

 

To request a review copy or to schedule an interview with Scott Hahn, please contact Katie Moore, publicist, kamoore@randomhouse.com, 719-268-1936.

 



Privacy Policy | Terms of Use
Top